Christians in academia (or when your wife uses your name in her blog anybody wanting to know more about your work will find out how she is going)

I have a bit of a pet theory, those people who write about morality from a social research perspective also spend time around Christians either because they are Christian or they research them. It is a pet theory in the worst possible sense, because it is something I concluded based on a hunch rather than solid evidence. One of the bodies of work that I thought disproved my pet theory was that of Stephen Vaisey. Sure religion featured pretty predominately in his rather technical analysis of values of young people in America and he worked on a John Templeton Foundation project, but I thought it did not quite fit my theory.

At least that was what I thought. I was trying to find out a bit more about his work today and came across a lot of information about him online. I could be wrong, but I think he a member of the LDS Church (they are the ones that have ‘Wards’ right?). I also found out a lot about his wife, kids and his family life really without looking very hard.

Sometimes I feel safe having a lot of information up online because the volume is just so big that it seems so unlikely that anybody will ever come across it. Then at times like these I realise search engines mean that there really is no way to be burred in a sea of information.

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2 Responses to “Christians in academia (or when your wife uses your name in her blog anybody wanting to know more about your work will find out how she is going)”

  1. attilathenun Says:

    There’s a fair amount of lapsed Catholicism amongst anthropologists of religion, from my (admittedly limited) experience.

    Mind you, as Prince teaches us, you can build a whole career on sexual fluidity and wearing purple and still turn out to be a scarily opinioned Jehovah’s Witness.

  2. Tracey Says:

    Wow! The things I miss thanks to my lack of knowledge about pop-culture. I’m off to look up more about Prince.

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